Sunday, September 11, 2016

New Way to Name The iPhone - An Apple-Only Opportunity to Change How Mobile Is Updated

Before Apple came out with the iPhone 7 on September 7th last week, their invitation had a play on the "7" and I was sort of sure that Apple would be fooling us about the naming scheme and actually end up calling the iPhone 7 just the iPhone or move onto another naming format.  I was wrong.

Sorta.

Like many others, I still believe the current naming scheme is unsustainable and would really think Apple will go with iPhone 20 thirteen years from now?  

With nearly identical form factors between the iPhone 6, iPhone 6S, and the iPhone 7, it would have been a perfect time for Apple to abandon it.  However, perhaps, next year would be a better time to do just that when Apple do release the next iPhone with a rumored new form factor.  

Here's why.  Apple had just gotten rid of the headphone jack.  Get that out of the way first - for whatever reason Apple truly got rid of it, let it be a distraction this year rather than next year when Apple truly ups its game next year.  It could be the same reason why Apple might wait until next year for the naming scheme.  

Whatever Apple does with the names and the new iPhone (I refuse to call it the iPhone 7S or iPhone 8), the new technology, form, and "wow" factor could be just what's needed for Tim Cook and company to go ahead and change things up for the naming of the iPhone.  It would serve as a distraction for the self-serving tech media.

More importantly, if Apple does it right and use the new naming scheme as an opportunity, it could well redefine how the iPhone and other iOS devices are perceived in the years to come - never having to worry about the dual-year update schedule with the form and really change how people think about updating their iPhones and other mobile devices. 

The new iPhone 7 this year, in and of itself, is a worthy update.  There is no doubt about that especially for folks who are pre-iPhone 6S.  It would have been nice to see early on how Apple wants  to change how the iPhone fits in our daily mobile routine and the upgrade cycle.  

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